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BLACKWELL [6191]

      Sex: U

Individual Information
     Birth Date: Abt 1875
    Christening: 
          Death: Bef 1911
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Alfred BLACKWELL [1295] (1840-1917) 
         Mother: Ann MILLER [1294] (1841-1923) 827 


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Ada Jane BLACKWELL [1491]



      Sex: F

Individual Information
     Birth Date: Dec Q 1871 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 828,829
    Christening: 19 Aug 1878 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 830
          Death: Mar Q 1936 - , Northamptonshire, England 831
         Burial: 

Events

Residence: 1881, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 22 Back Road, 1891, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 36 Lancaster Road, 1901-1911, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.


Parents
         Father: Alfred BLACKWELL [1295] (1840-1917) 
         Mother: Ann MILLER [1294] (1841-1923) 827 

Spouses and Children
1. *Albert Ernest WALKER [1568] (Jul 1868 - Aug 1946) 66 
       Marriage: Mar Q 1891 - Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England 832
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. William Alfred WALKER  833 [1569] (1892-1981)
                2. Albert Owen WALKER [6] (1895-1971)
                3. Theresa Kathleen WALKER [1571] (1899-1966)
                4. Thomas Harold E WALKER  834 [1570] (1904-1905)
                5. Grace Winifred WALKER [1572] (1906-1975)

Notes
General:
http://www.rushdenheritage.co.uk/Villages/people/walker-silver-wed1916.html
Rushden Echo, 28th April 1916, transcribed by Kay Collins
Councillor and Mrs. Ernest Walker
Silver Wedding

The Silver Wedding of Councillor and Mrs. Ernest Walker was celebrated on Easter Monday, when a number of Mr. and Mrs. Walker's friends and relatives assembled at their residence, 36 Lancaster-street, to do honour to the occasion. Mr. and Mrs. Walker were the recipients of many tangible expressions of felicitations in the shape of handsome articles of silver ware. Councillor Walker is a native of Ringstead, but has resided in the borough for upwards of 40 years, having left his birthplace at a very early age. About ten years ago he was elected, as a Labour member, to the Town Council, in which connection he has done a great deal of useful work, and has earned the high respect and esteem of his colleagues. He has been a member of the Higham Ferrers Boot and Shoe Productive Society for upwards of 16 years. Mrs. Walker is a native of the borough, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Blackwell, of Town-yard, both of whom are still living, although advanced in years. Mrs. Walker's father is 76 years of age and her mother 74. Both are natives of the borough, and during the whole of their lives have never resided away from the town of their birth. Mrs. Walker is one of the nurses at the Higham V.A.D. Hospital.

picture Adam Myles BLACKWELL [7941]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Malcolm I BLACKWELL [7937] 
         Mother: Jean SANDERS [7940] 


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Alan Walter Gilbert BLACKWELL [1613]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Douglas Lancelot BLACKWELL [242] (1905-1942) 835 
         Mother: Theadora MORGAN DAWES [241] (1906-1979) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Valerie KING [1648]
       Children:
                1. Gregory Alan BLACKWELL [1649]
                2. Andrew David BLACKWELL [1653]


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Alfred BLACKWELL [1295]



      Sex: M
AKA: Alfred BLACK
Individual Information
     Birth Date: 2 Mar 1840 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 836
    Christening: 16 Aug 1840 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 837
          Death: 26 Apr 1917 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 838
         Burial: 

Events

Residence: High Street, 1841, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: Newland Street, 1851, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Occupation: shoemaker, 1861.

Residence: 1861, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Occupation: shoemaker, 1871.

Residence: High Street, 1871, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Occupation: shoemaker, 1881.

Residence: High Street, 1881, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Occupation: rivetter, 1891.

Residence: High Street, 1891, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Occupation: shoe rivertter, 1901.

Residence: 73 High Street, 1901, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 12 Town Yard, 1911, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.


Parents
         Father: John BLACKWELL [1319] (Abt 1796-1870) 827 
         Mother: Ruth CLARKE [1318] (Abt 1798-1871) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Ann MILLER [1294] (2 Dec 1841 - 12 May 1923) 827 
       Marriage: 25 Dec 1864 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 839
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Sarah Jane MILLER BLACKWELL [1488] (1862-1920)
                2. Harry BLACKWELL [1489] (Abt 1866-1943)
                3. William BLACKWELL [1283] (1867-1953)
                4. Emily BLACKWELL  827 [1490] (1869-1958)
                5. Ada Jane BLACKWELL  827 [1491] (1871-1936)
                6. Ralph BLACKWELL [6190] (1873-1879)
                7. BLACKWELL  826 [6191] (Abt 1875-Bef 1911)
                8. Beatrice Annie BLACKWELL  827 [1492] (1878-1961)
                9. Charles Edgar BLACKWELL  827,840 [1493] (1880-1917)

Notes
General:
Christened under the surname Black.

At the 1841 Census, Alfred was living at High Street Higham Ferrers, and in the 1861, 1871 and 1881 census he was still living in High Street, Higham Ferrers. His occupation was given as shoemaker. On the 1911 Census, Alfred and Ann advised that they had 9 children, 2 of whom were deceased. We only had 7 children recorded, however I have since found Ralph's birth and death. The 9th child still has not been identified.

Beatrice, Ada and Ralph were all christened at Higham Ferrers on 19 Aug 1878 according to the Family Search website.

Witnesses to the marriage of Alfred and Ann were Charles Blackwell and Sarah Groom. Presumably Charles Blackwell was Alfred's brother, and Sarah Groom may have been a friend of Ann's as Ann's sister Eliza had married an Andrew Groom. In the same quarter and year of the marriage entry of Ann and Alfred, is the marriage of a Sarah Bethia Groom to a George Childs.

The family apparently kept in touch with their son William's late first wife's family because in 1911, almost 20 years after Evangaline died,her brother Edgar John Adams was staying with Alfred and Anne Blackwell at the time of the census. William had already emigrated to Australia by this time.

The Northampton Mercury - Saturday 25 March 1882 page 6
DISASTROUS FIRE AT HIGHAM FERRERS
GREAT DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY

On Tuesday Higham Ferrers was the scene of one of the most disastrous fires which have occurred of late years in the county of Northampton, and certainly one of the greatest magnitude that is within the remembrance of "the oldest inhabitant" of the particular locality indicated. "Higham", as most of our readers are aware, is one of those ancient places to be found in Northamptonshire of which it may be said that, if its ancient glory is not altogether departed, its relative influence and position are considerably reduced. Still it is a thriving business town. Practically, it consists of one long street on either side of which the houses for the most part are built in a style of architecture peculiar to a period that to the present generation is somewhat remote. In many cases the dwellings are of old material, covered with thatch, and it is to this fact that the alarming extent of the conflagration of Tuesday is undoubtedly due in the main.
The details we have been enabled to glean show that on the afternoon of Tuesday, about twenty minutes past one o'clock, as a man named Mason was returning, during his dinner hour, from his daily employment at Rushden, he when descending the hill entering the town, observed smoke issuing from the rear of the Swann Inn, an old established hostelry, kept by one Host Kilsby, and situate near the site formerly occupied by the now extinct tollgate, on the west side of the street. Thinking something was wrong, Mason at once made his way to the house, and acquainted its inmates of what he had seen. They, hitherto utterly oblivious of the fact disclosed, immediately made examination of the premises, and discovered that a fire had broken out near the kitchen. Prompt measures were at once taken to extinguish the flames; but, unfortunately, a blustering sou'-wester was blowing hard at the time, and catching hold of the flames, which soon began to leap through the thatch of the building, sent them with startling rapidity in the direction of the adjoining house. This being similarly covered the fire-for it had assumed these proportions in a few minutes-quickly communicated itself, by the aid of the favouring wind, to adjoining houses on the same side of the street, until in a quarter of an hour no less than fourteen adjacent cottages were in flames. The fifteenth house had also a thatched roof, but this, singularly enough, escaped. Not so, however, buildings on the opposite side of the street, as these became ignited from the multitude of sparks which the wind mercilessly drove onto the roofs. Here they soon obtained a firm hold, and by two o'clock -or about three quarters of an hour after the fire was first discovered-there were no less than twenty-five houses on either side on fire, if not roofless. During this time, of course, every effort had been made by the startled inhabitants to check the progress of the flames. Information was conveyed with despatch to the local fire brigade quarters, and their engine, under the command of Captain Shelton, was at the scene of the conflagration by a quarter to two. The news of the outbreak was also telegraphed to Rushden and Wellingborough. The brigade of the former place, under Captain Foskett, was but a few minutes behind the local team; while the Wellingborough Brigade arrived at a quarter-past two o'clock. Each brigade, in fact, displayed the most commendable promptitude in answering the call of duty; while the Police, under Supt. Baillie, of Wellingborough, were by no means behindhand, and lent valuable aid There being an ample supply of water-thanks to the contents of the moat of the ancient castle, and the numerous wells in the town-the brigades were soon able to get to work in earnest. The scene at this time it is no stretch of imagination to describe as of almost bewildering confusion. The street itself was enveloped in clouds of smoke, so dense in capacity and continuous volume, that many of those who were engaged in the midst of the fire aver that they actually could not see the flames springing from the roofs, though in reality these latter formed a blazing beacon, pointed to the consternation by the inhabitants of Wellingborough and other places for miles around. So rapid, to, did the fire travel from house to house, that, although the furniture of the cottages was hurried pell-mell out of the windows, both upstairs and down, quite indiscriminately, and every possible exertion was made to secure its removal, a very large proportion of it was destroyed by the consuming element; while nearly an equal amount was injured, almost past repair, by the rough handling it received. The density of the smoke before alluded to had one most regrettable effect, it seems that the inhabitants of the houses on the east side of the street, on witnessing the extreme peril in which their neighbours' property was placed, nobly went to their assistance, and it is a fact that while they were helping their friends to subdue the flames and rescue their furniture, their own houses and furniture were at the same time actually being consumed. As an illustration of the intensity of the heat caused by the fire, it may be mentioned that in one of the cottages a couple of fat porkers, weighing some 17 score, which had only been killed the day before, were completely frizzled. Thanks, however, to the united and well-directed exertions of the various brigades, and the welcome assistance of many willing workers, the fire, which at one time it was feared might extend itself to the greater part, if not the whole of the town, was got well under. Still such was the inflammable character of the material the flames had to work upon, that the conflagration was by no means extinguished. The engines continued for some time playing on the smouldering ruins. Only the bare walls and chimneys of the various dwellings were left standing through the combined effects of the large quantity of water poured upon them and the searching, destructive flames. Shortly after dusk the Wellingborough and Rushden brigades, after doing service which does them every credit, left the town, it being generally believed that what may be termed the remnants of the fire could safely be left to the efforts of the local brigade. The latter, we should add, were most watchful and unsparing in their exertions, members of the brigade being on duty all night for the purpose of extinguishing the flames which, in one cottage after another, fitfully made their appearance for many hours. Fortunately, by these admirable precautions the possibility of a renewed outbreak was prevented.
The fire, it is pretty generally believed, originated in the ignition of one of the huge beams in the interior of the Swan Inn. It is useless to speculate what the fearful consequences might have been had the conflagration occurred during the night; but it may certainly be said it was fortunate it happened just when it did. At that time the male occupants of the houses were at home, it being their dinner hour, and being thus on the spot were able at once to take prompt action for the preservation of their own property and the extinction of the fire. Though the latter was so extensive, it is pleasing to be able to state that no loss of life was caused, although Mr. S. J. Goll, grocer, sustained somewhat serious injuries, and a young girl named Charlotte Bailey had her eye severely burnt.
One of the most praiseworthy, as it is the most gratifying incidents in connection with an event which has rendered so many families homeless, at least in a temporary sense, was the practical sympathy and help shown by all classes, from the highest to the lowest, for the unfortunate sufferers by the fire. Not only did those who possessed them lend their horses and carts for the removal of furniture and the conveyance of water to the engines, but the clergy and principal inhabitants of the town and immediate neighbourhood were present at the fire, aiding, to the best of their ability, in the work of suppressing it. Nor were they lacking when the immediate danger was passed in extending their assistance to the distressed. The houses of many inhabitants were freely thrown open to afford accommodation. Fortunately, however, it was not found necessary to trespass on their good nature to a very great extent, as it so happened that near the destroyed cottages were a number of newly built dwellings, erected by Mr. Thomas Sanders, which that gentleman kindly placed at the disposal of those who needed shelter, and to those many transferred what furniture they had been able to save, and made themselves as comfortable as their altered circumstances would allow. The Rev. E. Templeman allowed the Bede-house to be used for the purpose of storing furniture, while the Mayor (Mr. J. Higgins) lent the Town Hall , and Mr. T. Sanders, his malt-house for the same object. The Vicar, The Mayor, and other of the better class of inhabitants, were most liberal in their offers of assistance, While Mr. W. Simpson made it his duty to go round in the evening and satisfy himself, on behalf of those kindly disposes persons, that no distress went unrelieved. It was also decided to hold a meeting in the morning of the magistrates and other benevolently disposed people for the purpose of forming a distress fund. In addition to those gentlemen mentioned, others who were at the fire and who offered kindly assistance were the Hon. T. W. Fitzwilliam, F. U. Sartoris, Esq., Mr. C. Simpson, Mr E. B. Randall, Mr. W. J. Lamb, and many others. The property destroyed, we may add, belonged to the following owners:- The Swan Inn, to Mr Campbell Praed; the two adjoining houses, to Mr. T Saunders; and the remainder to the executors of the Hon. G. Fitzwilliam. The property, we believe, was not insured, nor was any of the cottagers' furniture.
The following is a list of the names of the occupiers of the cottages which have been destroyed:-
G. Kilsby, wife, six children-lost nearly everything;
Henry Wright, wife and two children;
Charles Flawn and wife;
Mary Miller, infirm widow-lost everything
Alfred Blackwell, wife, and seven children;
Elizabeth Blackwell, widow and four children-lost all clothing and most of furniture;
Charles Groom, wife and two children;
William Mason, wife (recently confined) and seven children;
Mrs Park, widow, her grandson and his wife;
Thomas Pack, wife and one son;
Thomas Denton (who has been seriously ill for the last twelve months), his wife and three children-lost almost everything;
Elizabeth and Eliza Parker, and nephew and niece;
William Pack wife and three children;
William Wagstaff, wife and son-lost his savings, which were considerable;
William Riseley (who has been ill for some years), his wife and two children-lost everything;
William Linnett, wife and eight children;
James Draper, wife and four children;
William Warner, wife and four children-lost everything;
Eli Bailey, wife and seven children-lost almost everything. While Bailey is very ill, and one of his children was removed while suffering from severe illness;
Edward Scholes, niece and two lodgers-lost everything;
George Parker, daughter, her husband and two children-lost a lot of machine closer's work, entrusted to him to make up for a London firm for whom he worked;
Allen Draper, wife and three children;
Mrs Perkins and her brother (in one part of the house), with John Mayes, wife and four children (in other part), one of the latter very ill-reported loss of 40 cash in house;
Thomas Randall, wife and four children-lost everything;
Sarah Kingston, widow, with orphan niece and nephew-lost everything.
Tuesday night, which proved a very boisterous one, passed without any alarm being given of another outbreak. When morning dawned, the suns bright rays showed with remarkable clearness, the outlines of the smouldering ruins which the fire had caused. A very high wind was blowing, and by many it was feared some of the chimneys, which were exposed with but treacherous support, might be blown down. Up to noon, however, no such thing had occurred. The families who had occupied the houses passed the night fairly well, and were visited this morning by Dr. and Mrs. Crewe, who were solicitous in their inquiries as to the health of the unfortunate people, and careful to observe that the necessitous were duly provided for. The occupants of the houses we may state were a thrifty class. They paid comparatively low rents, but expended considerable sums in improving the property. The losses of some are serious. Thus G. Parker, it is estimated, has suffered to the extent of some 200, a new workshop he had built having been destroyed, together with a large quantity of work he had finished for a London firm, besides the damage to his machine. James Pack, Charles Groom, too, are others who have also lost what to them is no small sum in the improvements and additions they had made to the premises they occupied. We have remarked above the readiness of the inhabitants generally to assist in extinguishing the fire; but an instance of another kind has been mentioned. It is stated-on authority which is beyond question-that as a number of men were unconcernedly looking on at the conflagration, Mrs. Templeman inquired of them whether they were not going to assist in subduing the flames. The answer returned was "who's to pay"? Whereupon the vicar's good lady, remaking that a woman could show a man how to work, took her stand among the ranks of bucket-passers, and did her best to help stop the progress of the fire and at the same time stimulating others to do the same by her example. This instance, however, it is but just to state, is the only one in which we heard of any one showing an unwillingness to give their assistance.

ANOTHER ACCOUNT
"A Rushden Clicker" sends the following account:- At one o'clock everything was as usual, the weather was fine but it was very windy. When Mr. Nicholls's men were going back to work after dinner, at half past one, some of them noticed the roof of the Swan Inn smoking. Dr. Crewe, who was also passing at the time, smelt a strong smell of burning, and went in to inquire if anything was on fire. The thatch then commenced to flare, and although it was then only about as large as a man's hand, the wind soon puffed it into a strong blaze, and in ten minutes the roofs of about fifteen houses on the one side of the street and twelve on the other were all in flames. I had finished my dinner, and was just thinking of getting ready to go back to work, when we heart there was a fire at Higham. I sent out directly, and got there about twenty minutes to two, just when the fire was at it eight. I never saw such a big fire in all my life. As far as one could see through the smoke, on both sides of the street, the houses were all one blaze of light. Men were halloaing, women were crying, children screaming, the fire roaring, and the roofs of the houses falling in one after the other. Rushden fire engine soon put in an appearance, and in a minute or two both Rushden and Higham engines were in full swing. Everybody in Higham, and most people in Rushden and the adjoining places, where the news was carried to, gave up work for the day, so there was no lack of hands to work the engines; and when the Wellingborough Brigade appeared upon the scene the place was crowded. The women who were not employed in removing their own or their neighbours' property, turned out to help the men in handing buckets of water to supplement the efforts of the firemen. Right up the street there was a double line; the men on the one side handing the buckets of water to the scene of action, and the women on the other returning them to be replenished hand to hand. After the fire had been got under the place presented a pitiable scene in the extreme. Twenty seven houses, which two hours before were happy homes, were now completely gutted; while the occupants, some of whom have lost their little all, were turned out into the cold March wind without a place to call their own. One man had only saved his shirt and trousers, while his wife and children had only what they stood upright in. One poor woman, who was confined the day before, had to be taken from her bed and removed to a place of safety. At the Swan Inn there was about forty bushels of potatoes, which were all really "roasted"; and immediately opposite, two pigs that had been killed in the morning met the same fate.



A DISTRESS FUND FORMED
A public meeting was held in the Town Hall on Wednesday morning, for the purpose of establishing a fund for the relief of the distress caused by the disastrous fire. There was a good attendance, and a noteworthy fact was that several gentlemen were present from neighbouring villages. The Mayor (Mr. W. J. Higgins) was voted to the chair, and among those in attendance were the Rev. E. Templeman, Hon. T. W. Fitzwilliam, F. U. Sartoris, Esq., Mr. Campbell Praed, Spencer Pratt, Esq., Mr. Wetenhall (Stanwick), Mr. W. A. Pope (Stanwick), Mr. H. Packwood (Rushden), Dr. Crewe, Mr. Thompson, Mr. W. Simpson (deputy recorder), Mr. J. Saunderson, Mr. C. Simpson, Mr. E. B. Randall, Mr. S. Whyman, Mr. J. Lamb, Mr. G. Shelton, Mr. H. Saunders, Mr. T. Saunders, Mr. A. Groom, Mr. W. Spong, Mr. J. Spicer, Mr. J. Sargeant, Mr. B. Flintham, Mr. C. Parker, Mr. F Turner, Mr. S. J. Joll, &c.-The Mayor explained that the object of the meeting was to take into consideration what relief could be given to the sufferers through the destructive fire of the day before. That the case was one of the greatest urgency he need not say, and he therefore hoped, as many gentlemen were present, speakers would be brief in their remarks, so that they might commence their task in earnest, with as little delay as possible.-Rev. E. Templeman remarked that the ruined walls and roofless cottages spoke more eloquently than any words of their own in support of the object they had met to promote. There had been a great calamity in the place, and their object was to remedy the distress and suffering it had caused as well as they possibly could. With this end in view, he proposed "that the following committee be appointed for collecting and administering the funds for the relief of the sufferers by the fire of yesterday, with the power to add to their number:- The Mayor, Mr. W> Simpson, Mr. E. B. Randall, Mr. G. Shelton and Mr. T. Saunders; and that the following ladies be asked to assist the committee in its work, viz:- Mrs. Templeman, the Mayoress, Mrs. Simpson, and Mrs. Crewe." The rev. gentleman went on to say that he did not think they could decide exactly what had to be done at the present moment, as it would be necessary for them to go minutely into the circumstances of the persons who had suffered from the fire. One thing was quite certain-they would want money, but how much they did not know. In such a position it was only natural they should look for some assistance to a gentleman, who, directly he received the news announcing that the town was on fire, ordered a special train, and arrived on the spot with the greatest promptitude. (Hear, hear) He referred, of course, to the Hon. T. W. Fitzwilliam (applause), who represented the owners of nearly the whole of the property in Higham Ferrers. They were quite willing to do their part in carrying out the details of the work, but they must look to him to help them peculiarity in the matter. He (the speaker) had brought a bag with him in which to receive contributions, and had placed in it as his humble subscription to the Distress Fund.-Mr. W Lamb seconded the motion.- Mr. F. U. Sartoris read a letter he had received from Captain Arkwright, stating his regret at being unable to attend, and his willingness to help the fund which was being formed.-Mr. Campbell Praed wished to know if the losers by the fire were to be fully compensated, or only temporarily relieved?-Rev. E. Templeman said he did not think they could undertake to compensate all fully; but that would depend upon the amount of money subscribed.-Mr. Praed supposed, then, that any one who was not in impoverished circumstances would not be compensated.-Rev. E. Templeman replied that the fund was purely a charity .-Hon. T. W. Fitzwilliam observed that any compensation that was given would depend on the amount raised. If they were able to place the people in the position they occupied before the fire, they would be only too pleased to do so; but to do that it would be necessary to raise a considerable sum. As far as the Fitzwilliam property was concerned, he was not in a position yet to state what would be done, but he was sure the Marquis of Bristol (one of the trustees of the estate) would be glad to meet the matter in a liberal way. (Hear, hear) He had no authority to pledge the Marquis, as he had not had an opportunity of communicating with him. He would, however, write him that night, and communicate his answer to the Mayor as soon as he could. (Hear, hear)- Mr. F. U. Sartoris suggested the advisability of those present guaranteeing a sum of or so that the committee might draw at once and proceed with their work of relieving the distressed. The only doubt in his mind was whether they should do this, or put their names down for a definite sum at once. In any case, however, he thought an appeal might be made to the neighbouring villages for assistance. (Hear, hear)-Rev. E. Templeman said his idea was that they would require money at once, and that was the reason he hoped they would subscribe something at once.- Mr. W. Simpson said it was absolutely essential the committee should have funds at once. There were many cases in which the people were absolutely destitute. They had nothing whatever but what they stood upright in, and therefore the committee, to be of any service, should have funds at its disposal at once. (Hear, hear) As to how far the compensation would go, that was a matter which could only be decided when the committee knew what funds they had to dispose of. The previous evening he had spent several hours in ascertaining what the loss the people affected by the fire had sustained, and he discovered that they had saved very little indeed, and but a very few had saved anything considerable out of what they had. Therefore, he believed they would require a large sum, but he did not despair of seeing it raised. The people of Higham Ferrers were quite prepared to do their duty in the matter, and he did not think it would appeal to others who lived in the county to help them in vain. That this expectation would in all probability be fulfilled was strengthened by the fact that several gentlemen from neighbouring villages were present at that meeting to show their practical interest in the matter in hand. This disaster was too great for Higham to cope with alone and unaided, but they had every confidence in the liberality of outside people. The speaker (who, we should explain kindly acted as secretary,) then invited gentlemen to subscribe, observing that no doubt the Corporation would like to contribute something.-The resolution having been carried, alderman Randall proposed, and Alderman Saunderson seconded, that be paid out of the Corporation Fund towards the list of subscriptions.-This having been agreed to, the subscription list was circulated, and after a short interval showed a total amount subscribed in the room of The chief contributors were:-The Corporation Mr. Campbell Praed, Mr. F. W. Sartoris, the Mayor Hon. T. W. Fitzwilliam, Mr. W. A. and Mrs. Pope 10 each; Mr. Wetenhall, Mr. Spencer Pratt, Rev. E. Templeman, Messrs. Ward and Sheffield (Earl's Barton), names of the Rev. E Templeman, Hon. T. W. Fitzwilliam, and Mr. Campbell Praed were added to the committee; and, on the motion of the Chairman, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the gentlemen who had so liberally responded to the appeal which had been made.-Mr. H. Packwood (Rushden) suggested that the religious bodies of the neighbouring villages of Raunds, Irthlingborough, Finedon, Rushden and Wellingborough should be asked to allow collections at their services in aid of the Distress Fund. He felt certain there were any comparatively poor people who would be glad to show their sympathy to the distressed by subscribing their pence or their sixpences; and speaking for his own little place (the Union Church), he could say they would be only too pleased to have one, or even two collections in aid of the fund next Sunday. (Hear, hear)-On the motion of the Rev. E. Templeman, seconded by Mr. F. Turner, a hearty vote of thanks was conveyed to the Mayor for presiding, and the proceedings terminated.-Subsequently the committee met and requested the ladies to visit the distressed during the day and relieve the cases of necessity. In the evening another meeting was held in order to take the various cases into consideration.

Rushden Echo, 27th April 1917, transcribed by Kay Collins
Mr. Alfred Blackwell

The Death took place yesterday morning at 3 o'clock of a well-known resident of Higham Ferrers in the person of Mr. Alfred Blackwell, aged 77, of Town Yard. Mr Blackwell was seized with a stroke a week last Sunday and was only conscious at intervals up to the time of his end, which was very peaceful. Deceased, who was a native of Higham Ferrers and was a beadsman six or seven years ago, leaves a widow, aged 75, four daughters and three sons, 28 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon and the service will be conducted at the cemetery. One son is in Australia, and one is in the Tyneside Scottish Regt., serving in France.

picture Amy BLACKWELL [7909]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Richard John BLACKWELL [7908] 
         Mother: 


picture
Andrew David BLACKWELL [1653]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Alan Walter Gilbert BLACKWELL [1613] 
         Mother: Valerie KING [1648] 

Spouses and Children
1. *Jolanda STOKKEL [1654]
       Children:
                1. Sean BLACKWELL [1655]
                2. Natasha BLACKWELL [1854]
                3. Brody BLACKWELL [1853]


picture
Andrew Robert BLACKWELL [1665]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Robert Eric BLACKWELL [1617] (1941-2015) 
         Mother: Maria Joanne VUGGS [1664] 


picture
Annie BLACKWELL [4430]

      Sex: F

Individual Information
     Birth Date: Mar Q 1888 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 841
    Christening: 
          Death: 1969 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England 842
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Herbert Charles BLACKWELL [1483] (1860-1934) 
         Mother: Sarah KNIGHT [4427] (1863-1910) 843 

Spouses and Children
1. *Ernest DICKERSON [7560] (       -       ) 837 
       Marriage: 5 Aug 1911 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 837
         Status: 

Notes
General:
http://www.rushdenheritage.co.uk/genealogy/registers/methcircuitm-1865-1915.html
Rushden Research
37 Ernest DICKERSON 25 B shoe machine pressman College Street Irthlingborough George shoe hand
&
37 Annie BLACKWELL 23 S 88 High Street IrthlingboroughHerbert Charles boot operative
R 05 Aug 1911

picture Arthur BLACKWELL [4431]

      Sex: M

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 26 Feb 1892 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 841,844,845
    Christening: 
          Death: 20 Apr 1969 - Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Canada 844
         Burial: in Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Canada 844

Events

Residence: 31 Mar 1901, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 2 Town Yard, 1911, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.


Parents
         Father: Herbert Charles BLACKWELL [1483] (1860-1934) 
         Mother: Sarah KNIGHT [4427] (1863-1910) 843 

Spouses and Children
1. *Florence Patience LINE [10719] (6 Feb 1892 - 28 Sep 1983) 844 
       Marriage: 12 Sep 1914 - Weyburn, Saskatchewan, Canada 844
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Hilda Frances BLACKWELL  844 [10720] (1915-1996)
                2. Kenneth Roy BLACKWELL  844 [10721] (1920-2006)

Notes
General:
Arthur immigrated to Canada on 18 April 1913, where he married Florence Patience Line who was born in Rushden, Northamptonshire.

picture Barry Carlyle BLACKWELL [1624]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Paul Carlisle BLACKWELL [1553] (1920-2006) 
         Mother: Alma Rose DAWES [1554] (1923-2004) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Stasi Bernadette KATKEVICIUS [1683]
       Children:
                1. Russell John BLACKWELL [1684]
                2. Mark Anthony BLACKWELL [1685]


picture
Barry Charles BLACKWELL [7901]

      Sex: M

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 1942
    Christening: 
          Death: 2012 - , , England 109
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Victor Charles Henry BLACKWELL [7899] (1916-1988) 109 
         Mother: Nellie SHERWOOD [7914] (1915-2002) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Susan ABBOTT [7903]
       Children:
                1. Jocelyn E BLACKWELL [7904]
                2. Ian D BLACKWELL [7905]

2. Kathleen A MEANWELL [7906]
       Children:
                1. Claire Louise BLACKWELL [7907]


picture
Beatrice Annie BLACKWELL [1492]

      Sex: F

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 23 Feb 1878 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 846
    Christening: 19 Aug 1878 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 847
          Death: 17 Nov 1961 - Chester, Cheshire, England 848
         Burial: 

Events

Residence: Railway Cottage, 1901, Lamport, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 116 Dee View,, 1911, Oakenholt, Flintshire, England. (Occupant)

Residence: 71 St Marks Road, 1939, Chester, Cheshire, England.

Residence: 71 St Marks Road, 1961, Saltney, Flintshire, England.


Parents
         Father: Alfred BLACKWELL [1295] (1840-1917) 
         Mother: Ann MILLER [1294] (1841-1923) 827 

Spouses and Children
1. *Joe TEBBUTT [7519] (Abt 1877 - 17 Nov 1951)
       Marriage: 11 Feb 1901 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 849,850
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Ralph Joseph TEBBUTT [7520] (1904-1976)
                2. Ivy Beatrice TEBBUTT [7526] (1911-1982)

Notes
General:
Joe and Beatrice were married in the Parish Church according to the rights and ceremonies of the Established Church by T W Pritchard, Assistant Curate. Witnesses to the marriage were Harry Blackwell and Alice Tebbutt. Joe's address was given as Lamport at the time of his marriage and his occupation was given as signalman. His father was Thomas Tebbutt, a currier.

At her death, Beatrice was a widow living at Saltney, Chester. Probate was granted in 1962 to Robert Hayes William Simon, retired Bakers manager. Her estate was valued ad 1094 7s.

It would appear that she died 10 years to the day after the death of her husband Joe.


picture Bertha Davy BLACKWELL [1486]

      Sex: F

Individual Information
     Birth Date: Mar Q 1872 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 851,852
    Christening: 19 Aug 1878 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 853
          Death: 
         Burial: 

Events

Residence: High Street, 1901, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.


Parents
         Father: Charles BLACKWELL [1481] (Abt 1835-1866) (Relationship: not biological )
         Mother: Elizabeth PARKER [1482] (Abt 1834-After 1911) 
         Father: Charles BLACKWELL [1481] (Abt 1835-1866) 
         Mother: 

Notes
General:
Probably married Frederick Joseph Pashler in 1904 Higham Ferrers and had two children
* Cyril Frederick Pashler b. 1904 Rushden, died Q Dec 1918 and
* Howard Owen Pashler b. Sept 1906 Wellingborough d. Sep 1906 Wellingborough.

Frederick Joseph Pashler was born in 1872 and served in the Royal Army Medical Corp in WW1 and died on 25 November 1918 in England.

Bertha Pashler died in Wellingborough in 1951

picture Beryl Edyth Ethel BLACKWELL [1614]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Douglas Lancelot BLACKWELL [242] (1905-1942) 835 
         Mother: Theadora MORGAN DAWES [241] (1906-1979) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Donald Frederick CAMPBELL [1656]
       Children:
                1. Belinda Louise CAMPBELL [1657]
                2. Sheridan Lisa CAMPBELL [1658]
                3. Glenn Donald CAMPBELL [1659]


picture
Beverley Doris BLACKWELL [1619]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Eric William BLACKWELL [1551] (1916-1990) 854 
         Mother: Lilian May GORRIE [1552] (1913-1993) 

Spouses and Children
1. *John Charles OCCLESHAW [1671]
       Children:
                1. Tracey Lee OCCLESHAW [1672]
                2. Anthony Richard OCCLESHAW [1674]
                3. Adam John OCCLESHAW [1675]


picture
Brody BLACKWELL [1853]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Andrew David BLACKWELL [1653] 
         Mother: Jolanda STOKKEL [1654] 


picture
Charles BLACKWELL [1481]

      Sex: M
AKA: Charles BLACK
Individual Information
     Birth Date: Abt 1835 - , , England
    Christening: 20 Aug 1837 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England
          Death: 18 Apr 1866 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 855,856
         Burial: 23 Apr 1866 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 857

Events

Residence: 1841, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 1861, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 1911, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.


Parents
         Father: John BLACKWELL [1319] (Abt 1796-1870) 827 
         Mother: Ruth CLARKE [1318] (Abt 1798-1871) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Elizabeth PARKER [1482] (Abt 1834 - After 1911)
       Marriage: 22 Aug 1859 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England 858,859
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Herbert Charles BLACKWELL [1483] (1860-1934)
                2. Emma Maria BLACKWELL [1484] (1862-1938)
                3. Mary Elizabeth BLACKWELL [6645] (Abt 1864-1865)
                4. Horace Thomas BLACKWELL [6644] (1865-1867)
                5. Gertrude Kate BLACKWELL  851 [1485] (1869-      ) (biologial child of one parent) (Father: not biological )
                6. Bertha Davy BLACKWELL  851 [1486] (1872-      ) (biologial child of one parent) (Father: not biological )
                7. Horace George BLACKWELL  851 [1487] (1878-1941) (biologial child of one parent) (Father: not biological )
       Children:
                1. Gertrude Kate BLACKWELL  851 [1485] (1869-      )
                2. Bertha Davy BLACKWELL  851 [1486] (1872-      )
                3. Horace George BLACKWELL  851 [1487] (1878-1941)

Notes
General:
Christened under the surname Black.

Charles Blackwell died in 1866. I have now found the burial of Charles at Higham Ferrers in April 1866. This would make the last 3 children who were born to Charles's wife from 1868 onwards not his children.

An Ann Clarke was present at the death of Charles. It is possible that this is one of his mother's family.

picture Charles BLACKWELL [4429]

      Sex: M

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 9 Oct 1883 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 841
    Christening: 6 Mar 1887 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 837
          Death: 28 Apr 1970 - Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, England 860
      Cremation: 1 May 1970 - Kettering Crematorium, Kettering, Northamptonshire, England 861

Parents
         Father: Herbert Charles BLACKWELL [1483] (1860-1934) 
         Mother: Sarah KNIGHT [4427] (1863-1910) 843 

Spouses and Children
1. *Rosa CHAMBERLAIN [5965] (Abt 1884 - 23 May 1969) 844,860 
       Marriage: 
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Herbert Charles BLACKWELL [5966] (1907-      )
                2. Emily Constance BLACKWELL [5967] (1910-      )


picture
Charles BLACKWELL [7536]

      Sex: M
AKA: Charles BLACK
Individual Information
     Birth Date: Abt 1825
    Christening: 21 Aug 1825 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 837
          Death: Jul 1826
         Burial: 20 Jul 1826 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 862

Parents
         Father: John BLACKWELL [1319] (Abt 1796-1870) 827 
         Mother: Ruth CLARKE [1318] (Abt 1798-1871) 

Notes
General:
Christened under the surname Black. Burial information under Charles Black.

picture Charles Edgar BLACKWELL [1493]



      Sex: M

Individual Information
     Birth Date: Sep 1880 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 863,864
    Christening: 28 May 1882 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 865,866
          Death: 9 Apr 1917 - , , France 867,868,869
         Burial: Apr 1917 - Roclincourt Valley Cemetery, , France 870

Events

Residence: High Street, 1891, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 73 High Street, 1901, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 12 Town Yard, 1911, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Military: World War 1 British Army regimental number 48388, 1914-1918.


Parents
         Father: Alfred BLACKWELL [1295] (1840-1917) 
         Mother: Ann MILLER [1294] (1841-1923) 827 

Notes
General:
Charles was a private in the Northumberland Fusiliers. Part of the 21st Battalion (tyneside Scottish) and was killed in Action in the Western European Theatre. Formerly 179288 RHA. His regimental number was 48388. It is possible that Charles took part in the 2nd Battle of Arras, also known as the Battle for Vimy Hill. This offensive commenced on the 9th of April 1917 in the area where Charles appears to have been killed on that date.

The Battle of Arras began in a snowstorm on 9th April 1917, when Australian, British, and Canadian Divisions fought on a front from Vimy Ridge in the north (Canadian sector), to the trenches east of Arras (British sector), to Bullecourt in the south (Australian sector). It was hoped that the much-awaited breakthrough might be made here. However, the key purpose of the offensive was to tie down the German army in a joint effort with the French, who were simultaneously attacking on the Chemin des Dames. This latter offensive was a complete and costly failure resulting in mutinies among many French divisions.
The Battle of Arras slogged on until mid-May 1917, following a final large-scale attack on 3rd May when casualties were particularly high on the British side. It became the greatest killing battle of the war, with a daily casualty rate even higher than the Somme.

Only an estimated 30% - 40% of the WW1 British military service records have survived due to being destroyed by fire during Second World War bombings, and sadly Charles record appears to be in the 60%- 70% that have been lost.

From the Commonwealth War Graves Photographic Project website, which includes a photograph of the headstone I obtained the following details.
Cemetery: Roclincourt Valley Cemetery
Country: France
Area: Pas De Calais
Rank: Private
Official Number: 48388
Unit: 21st (Tyneside Scottish) Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers.
Force: Army
Nationality: British
Details: 9th April 1917. III. F. 10.

Roclincourt is a village a little to the east of the road from Arras to Lens. Take the N17 from Arras until the junction of this road and the D60. Travel along the D60 into Roclincourt village. Roclincourt Valley Cemetery lies to the north-east of the village. It is on a farm track signposted off the Thelus road.
Historical Information: Roclincourt was just within the Allied lines before the Battle of Arras in 1917 and it was from here that the 51st (Highland) and 34th Divisions advanced on 9 April 1917. The 1st Canadian Division attacked further north, across the Lens road. Roclincourt Valley Cemetery (originally called Roclincourt Forward Cemetery No.2) was begun after 9 April 1917 by the units which fought on that day. It was used until the following August when it contained the graves of 94 soldiers, of whom 40 belonged to the 51st Division. These form Plot I, Rows A to E and part of Row F. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves, almost all of April 1917 and mostly from the 34th and 51st Divisions, were brought in from the surrounding battlefields and from certain smaller cemeteries, including:- KING CRATER CEMETERY, ROCLINCOURT: a mine crater, it contained 99 burials in five big graves, made by the 34th Division in the middle of April 1917, all dating from 9 April. All but two belonged to the Tyneside Brigades of the Northumberland Fusiliers. KITE CRATER CEMETERY, ST LAURENT-BLANGY, contained 53 burials of 9 April 1917 in five big graves, mainly of the 34th Division. RABS ROAD CEMETERY, ST LAURENT-BLANGY, contained 20 burials of 9 or 13 April 1917, 16 belonging to the 15th or 16th Royal Scots. ROCLINCOURT LONG CEMETERY (called at one time Roclincourt Forward Cemetery No.3), contained 68 burials of 9 April 1917, all 51st Division. THELUS ROAD CEMETERY, ROCLINCOURT, was made by the XVII Corps and contained 42 burials of 9 April 1917, 51st Division. The cemetery now contains 518 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 83 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to four casualties known, or believed, to be buried among them. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield. (information from Commonwealth War Graves Commission).

see also https://www.wikitree.com/index.php?title=Blackwell-2386 871

picture Charlotte BLACKWELL [7534]

      Sex: F
AKA: Charlotte BLACK
Individual Information
     Birth Date: 1819 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 872
    Christening: 22 Aug 1819 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 837
          Death: After 1891
         Burial: 

Events

Residence: 1851, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.

Residence: 63 High Street, 1881, Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England.


Parents
         Father: John BLACKWELL [1319] (Abt 1796-1870) 827 
         Mother: Ruth CLARKE [1318] (Abt 1798-1871) 

Spouses and Children
1. *William GROOM [7537] (1816 -       ) 837 
       Marriage: Dec Q 1840 - Higham Ferrers, Northamptonshire, England 873
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Sarah GROOM  837 [7540] (1843-      )
                2. George GROOME  874 [9260] (1845-1846)
                3. Emma GROOM  837 [7541] (Abt 1847-1867)
                4. Alfred GROOM [7542] (1850-1862)
                5. William GROOM  837 [7543] (Abt 1853-1891)
                6. Frederick GROOM  837 [7544] (Abt 1857-      )
                7. Rhena GROOM  837 [7545] (Abt 1861-1877)

Notes
General:
Christened under surname Black. Married under the name Blackwell.

In the 1861 census, Charlotte is described as a widow although I have not found her husbands death. At the 1891 census, Charlotte was living with her son William. I have been unable to find either Charlotte's son William or Charlotte in the 1901 census. I have found a possible death of a Charlotte Groom at Kings Norton, Worcestershire, in the October quarter of 1896, estimated birth of this Charlotte was abt 1816.

picture Charmaine Louise BLACKWELL [1327]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Douglas Geoffrey Francis BLACKWELL [186] 
         Mother: Nancye June BONHAM [185] 

Spouses and Children
1. *Neil JEREMIAH [1329]
       Children:
                1. Matthew Francis William BLACKWELL [1328]


picture
Christine Lee BLACKWELL [1678]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Lindsay Alan BLACKWELL [1620] 
         Mother: Joy Marie SHARP [1676] (1951-2020) 


picture
Christopher J BLACKWELL [7939]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Spencer Robert BLACKWELL [7900] (1917-1999) 109 
         Mother: Bertha Ada BALL [7936] (1920-1995) 416 

Spouses and Children
1. *Vanetta M YATES [7943]
       Children:
                1. Deanna Marie BLACKWELL [7944]

2. Valerie OLIVER [7945]
       Children:
                1. Georgina BLACKWELL [7946]


picture
Claire Louise BLACKWELL [7907]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Barry Charles BLACKWELL [7901] (1942-2012) 109 
         Mother: Kathleen A MEANWELL [7906] 

Spouses and Children
1. *MITCHELL [7930]


picture
Clifford Arthur Bernard BLACKWELL [1612]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Douglas Lancelot BLACKWELL [242] (1905-1942) 835 
         Mother: Theadora MORGAN DAWES [241] (1906-1979) 

Spouses and Children
1. Jennifer Rose JOHNSON [1645] (30 Jul 1944 - 31 Oct 1983)
       Marriage: 
         Status: 

2. *Hilda Tilar TIBERIO [1646]
       Children:
                1. Hannah Jasmine Tiberio BLACKWELL [1647]


picture
Constance Mavis BLACKWELL [1593]



      Sex: F

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 10 Jul 1920 - Dandenong, Victoria, Australia
    Christening: 
          Death: 12 Dec 2012 - , Victoria, Australia 875
      Cremation: Dec 2012 - Private cremation 876

Parents
         Father: Gilbert Darlow BLACKWELL [1540] (1896-1973) 877 
         Mother: Annie DAVIES [1541] (1896-1969) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Alfred James KNEE [1594]
       Children:
                1. Julie Anne KNEE [1629]
                2. Robyn Mae KNEE [1630]
                3. Brian James KNEE [1633]
                4. Iain Gilbert KNEE [1631]


picture
Coral Janine BLACKWELL [2]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Douglas Geoffrey Francis BLACKWELL [186] 
         Mother: Nancye June BONHAM [185] 

Spouses and Children
1. *Michael James JONES [910]
       Children:
                1. Michelle Janine JONES [1]
                2. Tristan James JONES [4]
                3. Lachlan Douglas James JONES [5]


picture
Craig Douglas BLACKWELL [1669]

      Sex: M

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 6 Nov 1966 - Pakenham, Vic, Australia
    Christening: 
          Death: 20 Oct 1992 - Bundaberg, Qld, Australia
         Burial: 

Parents
         Father: Lance Douglas BLACKWELL [1618] 
         Mother: Shirley Christina SHARPE [1668] (1945-2004) 


picture
Damon Paul BLACKWELL [1769]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: David FAIRLESS [10153] 
         Mother: Narelle Kylie BLACKWELL [1691] 


picture
Daniel Geoffrey Robert BLACKWELL [1846]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: 
         Mother: Naomi Jeanette BLACKWELL [1336] 


picture
Darren Anthony BLACKWELL [1680]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Uk [?] [3234] (      -      ) 
         Mother: Gail Olga BLACKWELL [1622] 


picture
Darryl William BLACKWELL [1616]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Eric William BLACKWELL [1551] (1916-1990) 854 
         Mother: Lilian May GORRIE [1552] (1913-1993) 


picture
David Graham BLACKWELL [7902]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Victor Charles Henry BLACKWELL [7899] (1916-1988) 109 
         Mother: Nellie SHERWOOD [7914] (1915-2002) 


picture
Deanna Marie BLACKWELL [7944]

      Sex: F

Parents
         Father: Christopher J BLACKWELL [7939] 
         Mother: Vanetta M YATES [7943] 


picture
Dennis Bruce BLACKWELL [1625]

      Sex: M

Parents
         Father: Paul Carlisle BLACKWELL [1553] (1920-2006) 
         Mother: Alma Rose DAWES [1554] (1923-2004) 

Spouses and Children
1. *Vivienne Janette MISTRETTA [1686]
       Children:
                1. Sharon Marie BLACKWELL [1687]
                2. Janette Lea BLACKWELL [1688]


picture
Doris Augustus BLACKWELL [1538]



      Sex: F

Individual Information
     Birth Date: 6 Aug 1895 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England 878
    Christening: 25 Aug 1895 - Kettering, Northamptonshire, England 879,880
          Death: 1 Mar 1927 - Melbourne South, Vic, Australia 881,882
         Burial: 2 Mar 1927 - Melbourne, VIC, Australia

Parents
         Father: William BLACKWELL [1283] (1867-1953) 
         Mother: Ada Primrose DARLOW [1282] (1874-1942) 

Spouses and Children
1. *William Isaac Peter PETTMAN [1539] (1895 - 1953)
       Marriage: 10 Sep 1919 - Nar Nar Goon, Vic, Australia 883
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Claude Cedrick PETTMAN [1578] (1920-1974)
                2. Ralph William PETTMAN [1609] (1921-1921)
                3. Bernard Russell PETTMAN [1584] (1922-1999)
                4. Rex Clifford PETTMAN [1586] (1924-2000)
                5. Doris Joyce PETTMAN [1588] (1926-2003)

Notes
General:
Family story has it that Doris went out and arrived home later than expected. The house was locked up when she returned and she got a chill. The chill turned to pneumonia and Doris died.

The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957) Saturday 1 March 1930 Page 13
PETTMAN.-In loving memory of Doris, dearly beloved, wife of William, and loving mother of Claude, Bernard, Rex, and Joyce, who passed away on March 1, 1927.
Just a memory fond and true,
To show, dear Doris, we think of you;
Not gone from memory, not gone from love.
But gone to a better home above,
-(Inserted by her loving husband and children.)

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Tue 4 Mar 1930 Page 1 Family Notices
PETTMAN. - In loving memory of our dear daughter and sister, Doris, who died 1st March, 1927. Gone, but not forgotten. - Inserted by her loving parents and sister, Mr. and Mrs W. Blackwell and sister, Phyllis

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Tue 3 Mar 1936 Page 1 Family Notices
PETTMAN (Blackwell). - In loving memory of our dear Doris, who died 1st March, 1927. Parted, but not forever.
- Inserted by mother, father, sisters and brothers
PETTMAN. - In loving memory of my dear sister, Doris, who passed away 1st March, 1927.
- Inserted by her loving brother, Bern.

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Tue 1 Mar 1938 Page 1 Family Notices
PETTMAN (nee Blackwell) - In loving memory of my sister, Doris,, died March 1, 1927. Parted, but not for ever. - Vincent and Esther.

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Wed 1 Mar 1939 Page 16 Family Notices
PETTMAN (nee Blackwell). - In : memory of our dear daughter and sister, Doris, died March 1, 1927., Ever remembered.
- By her mother and father, brothers and sister, Narnargoon, and Gilbert and Annie, Ormond. .

The Age (Melbourne, Vic. : 1854 - 1954) Sat 1 Mar 1941 Page 13 Family Notices
PETTMAN (nee Doris Blackwell). - In loving memory of our dear daughter and sister, Doris who passed away March 1, 1927. A silent thought brings many a tear. Of one we miss and love so dear. - Inserted by her loving parents, sisters and brothers. Bob, Annie, Gilbert, Paul, Eric. Phyllis
and Lil, Narnargoon.

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